INTRODUCTION: CLEAN AND ORGANIZE YOUR CLOSET..FOR ONCE AND FOR ALL!

INTRODUCTION: CLEAN AND ORGANIZE YOUR CLOSET..FOR ONCE AND FOR ALL!

This instructable will teach you how to clean out your closet, and then organize the clothes and other items you decide to keep in your closet.

What will you need?

Storage bins
Labels for bins
Cleaning supplies- vacuum, duster, air freshener
Optional- hanging mirror, command strips, curtains.

STEP 1: TAKE “OUT OF SEASON” ITEMS AND STORE THEM ELSEWHERE TO MAKE ROOM IN YOUR CLOSET

– Gather storage device that will easily fit your under bed, or elsewhere in room.

Label the storage device what clothes are inside to remember at a future time.

– Remove items from closet, put them in storage devices, and place under bed or elsewhere in room.

STEP 2: SCAN YOUR CLOSET FOR ITEMS THAT CAN BE SOLD OR GIVEN TO GOODWILL (ROUND 1)

– Get two separate bags large enough for clothes and items.

– Label one bag “sell” and one bag “good will”.

– Divide up your items into the bags appropriately.

STEP 3: FOR ITEMS YOU WANT TO KEEP, MAKE SURE YOU WANT TO KEEP THEM (ROUND 2)

– Try every item on.

– Ask yourself these questions and determine appropriately.

Questions to ask yourself:

does it fit?
when is the last time I wore it?
do I like it?
will I wear it again?
– Repeat for shoes and bags.

– If you find any other items you want to get rid of, separate them into the “sell” or “good will” bag, or throw it away.

Now you have cleaned out your closet, and made room for everything you want to keep and organize.

STEP 4: SEPARATE THE ITEMS YOU ARE KEEPING, BY CATEGORY

– Put shirts in one pile.

– Put pants in one pile.

– Put shoes in one pile.

– Put miscellaneous items into another pile.

These piles are easy for you to see what you have, how many of each item you have, and how much space you need for each pile.

STEP 5: DETERMINE WHAT PART OF THE CLOSET YOUR SHOES, PANTS, AND SHIRTS WILL GO

– Gather enough hangers for each pair of pants.

– Gather enough hangers for each shirt.

– Find a place for a shoe rack (hanging or standing), or even a place to line them up neatly in pairs.

– Save enough space of miscellaneous items on shelving or the floor.

STEP 6: PUT ITEMS IN THEIR PLACE

– Hang shirts up in color coded order.

Don’t hang up shirts that will easily get hanger lines/ stretch out (fold and place these items in a drawer, instead).
– Hang pants up according to length.

– Put shoes together in pairs, so they can easily be found.

Put shoes on a rack, or some sort of shoe storage device.
– Make use of closet doors by adding an over the door hanger to create extra hanging devices.

STEP 7: IF YOU KEEP JEWELRY IN YOUR CLOSET (IF NOT, SKIP THIS STEP)

– Separate jewelry by bracelet, necklace, and earrings.

– Hang up a peg board or some sort of board that you can insert push pins into.

Hang jewelry up on the pin board or hang them over the push pins according to type (necklace or bracelet).
– Put earrings all together in a jewelry box or some sort of container.

8

STEP 8: GATHER UP MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS AND DETERMINE WHERE YOU WANT THEM TO GO

– Use storage bins for things that aren’t used on a daily basis (can be used to stack other necessary items on).

– Neatly place everyday items on closet shelving in height order, so you can easily spot everything.

– Hang up command strips (cheap and easy) for purses, bath towels, scarfs, etc.

– Make labels for everything in your closet that are in bins for easier access in the future.

STEP 9: FRESHEN AND CLEAN YOUR CLOSET

– Dust the shelves.

– Vacuum the floor if possible (for walk-ins).

– Spray the closet with air freshener or get a special freshener for the closet to eliminate shoe odors.

STEP 10: ADD YOUR PERSONALIZED TOUCHES (CHOOSE HOWEVER MANY OF THESE YOU WANT TO DO)

– Hang up a mirror on the door

– Hang pictures on the door

– Hang lights around the door

– Replace closet door with a curtain for a fun change

An easy DIY way of hanging a curtain in replace of a door is to buy a tension rod (cheap), hang the curtain on it, and easily put it in place of a door.

Make sure you get the correct measurements for the door frame so you buy the right size tension rod.

STEP 11: VOILA- A CLEAN AND ORGANIZED CLOSET- MAINTENANCE IS KEY!

Upkeep on the cleanliness on the closet and don’t leave anything on the floor or out of place!

How to Sew Using Patterns

How to Sew Using Patterns
After learning to sew, it’s a natural step to learning to sew with a pattern. Being able to sew using a pattern will provide you with many options for creating garments, costumes, soft furnishings, toys, and other items that can be sewn. This article explains how to sew using patterns.

Part One of Five:
Choosing Your Size

1
Select the right size for the person who will wear the garment.

If it’s for you, have a friend measure you first.Do keep in mind that the units you choose for measurement should not change as it may cause confusion while stitching. Remember, it will not necessarily be the same size as the ready-to-wear clothing you already own, as pattern sizing can vary considerably from what you’re used to wearing. Look on the back of the pattern envelope and determine your size by the “finished” measurements it provides.
Most pattern companies follow an international code for sizes.[1]

2
Watch out for multi-sized patterns. Some patterns are multi-sized. This means that they will be suitable for a wide range of sizes, although they’ll usually still provide an indication of the size range. You’ll need to look on the pattern itself for the markings of where to cut for each size.

3
Leave space for alterations.

All patterns contain an allowance for fit, known as “fit or wearing ease”, or “designer ease”, assuming they are designed for fabrics that require this allowance.[2] The allowance is not included for garments designed for knit fabrics, since these fabrics have natural stretch. Read the instructions on your pattern to find the allowance or look on the pattern itself for “finished” measurements, or something similar.
Compare the difference between the finished measurements and your body measurements in order to find the allowance.
If you don’t want the allowance that is included, or if you want to make it smaller or larger, you’ll need to look out for this.
This allowance will determine what the final size is for the garment, and indicates whether the garment will fit loosely or closely. Some companies have a standard allowance that corresponds to the descriptions (loose-fitting, fitted, etc.).[3]
For beginners it is probably better attern can be set aside.\nIs it easier to make doll clothes or realto ignore all of this, as you may not be ready to alter patterns. If you’re unsure, leave in the allowance and take the final garment to a tailor.

Part Two of Five:
Reading the Pattern

1
Read the directions. Every pattern comes with step-by-step instructions on a separate sheet (user guide), as well as the pattern template sheet (pattern tissue). You should always read the instructions in the user guide before starting the sewing project so that you’re aware of what’s expected.
The advice will include how to cut out the template sheet (pattern tissue), how to construct the garment or item, the best way to select sizing, etc.

2
Check for seam allowances.

Check the pattern instructions to find out if the pattern is with or without seam allowances. If it does not include seam allowances, you’ll need to cut the fabric with the seam allowances later. It is more normal for seam allowances not to be included.

3
Notice the grain lines. This is a long straight line with arrow heads at one or both ends. This arrow tells you which direction the paper pattern pieces should sit over the grain of the weave (which direction the grain of the fabric needs to go). For stretch fabrics, they might indicate the direction with most stretch.
The grain line of the fabric is the same as the direction of the selvage edges (the white edge where the pattern ends). Simply locate the selvage edge to determine the grain line or direction of the fabric.

4
Look for the notches. These are the triangular marks on the cutting lines. Use them for matching panels precisely, such as an arm in an armhole. You can get single, double, and triple notches. Pros will make tiny cuts into the seam allowance where these notches are but beginners should cut mirrored triangles beyond the cut line, in order to line up the pattern pieces.
Usually a single notch indicates the front of a garment while a double notch indicates the back. This is not universal, however.[4]

5
Find the dots. These little circles can show where darts, zips, pockets, or gathering are to be added, though they usually indicate where you need to place tacks in order to line up two layers of fabric. Refer to your pattern instructions if you are unsure.
If the pattern does not explain and you see two matching dots on opposite pieces of the pattern, then it is reasonable to assume that these two match up.
Zipper lines are almost always indicated with a zig-zag line.

6
Look for button markings. Button placement is usually show with an X, while button holes are marked with a bracket line (like the number lines you drew in your math classes), marking the actual size of the button hole.

7
Look for lengthening and shortening lines. These are parallel lines, usually placed very close together, that show where you can increase or reduce the size of the pattern to improve fit. Always read your pattern instructions to understand how to deal with these, as it usually varies between patterns

8
Use the cutting lines. This line is the thick, solid on the outside of a pattern. You should cut along this line. Sometimes it will not be solid and you will see a large number of lines. These indicate that a number of different sizes can be cut, by follow a specific pattern line. Sometimes the size is listed on or near the line, sometimes it is listed in the instructions.

9
Check for sewing lines. Sometimes this broken or dotted line is included to indicate where the sewing occurs. It’s often left out because there is a standard understanding that the sewing occurs 5/8″ or 15mm inside the cutting line, so if you don’t see it, don’t panic.


10
Sew in darts. If you see a large triangle or diamond shape in your pattern, this is usually to indicate a dart. Darts shape a single piece of fabric to make it fit around a curved form.


11
Watch out for fold lines. These lines, usually clearly labeled on indicated with a special line or bracket, indicate where a piece of fabric should be folded, not cut. Be careful not to cut along this line.[5]

Part Three of Five:
Using the Pattern


1
Cut out the pattern pieces. Find each pattern piece that you will need to use and cut it out. You will cut the fabric using the solid line on the pattern pieces as a guide.
Use a pair of scissors specifically earmarked for cutting out paper sewing patterns. Keep another pair of 8″ (20.3cm) long scissors specifically earmarked for cutting out fabric. Sewing patterns tend to dull scissors and sharp scissors are needed to easily cut fabric.
If you slip and make a cut where you shouldn’t have, simply tape it back into place as best you can. The important thing is that the shape is retained and that you can still read the markings.
You can transfer the final cut-out pattern onto card-stock or cardboard if you want a stiffer pattern to use.


2
Lay out the patterns according to the user guide. The user guide will contain a fabric layout guide for each of the items in the pattern pack.
The layouts can vary according to which fabric widths you’ve chosen and whether the fabric is “with nap” or not.[6] The term “nap” refers to the up-and-down nature of a print (namely, could the design be cut upside down by accident?).
Pin the pattern pieces to the fabric following the user guide. Usually you will pin the pieces together using 5/8″ (15mm) seam allowance. However, make sure you double-check the seam allowance in the pattern because not all patterns use 5/8″ (15mm). You can also use pattern weights so you won’t damage fine or delicate fabric with the needles.
You will now have half of the garment. Have a friend check the fit and help you make any needed alterations in size or length.


3
Mark and cut the pattern. Mark the pattern using tailor’s chalk or a tracing wheel and tracing paper. You can also make tape labels for the back of each pattern piece so you won’t get confused when you start to sew and don’t know what you are looking at.

Part Four of Five:
Other Considerations


1
Choose a simple pattern for a first-time sewing project. The less complicated, the easier it is to learn how to use the pattern. Always read the description on the pattern packaging when deciding whether or not the pattern interests you; it will contain guidance on the item, including suggestions for wearing or use. In addition to the overall description, the details about the garment or item are often on the back of the pattern envelope and will help guide you on fit and style.


2
Check to make sure you like the item. On the pattern you buy you should find an image of the completed item. Most patterns will include a photograph of the completed garment or item on the front of the pattern, with illustrations on the back. If there are variations such as different sleeve lengths, different styles, different collars, etc., the images will usually show these. When trying to get an idea of how a finished garment will look, refer to the photographs over drawings, as they’re more realistic.


3
Check the pattern’s difficulty level. On the package, there should be some indicator of difficulty level. Some pattern companies give an indication of the suitability from beginner to advanced. Trust this estimation and don’t bite off more than you can chew.


4
Avoid lined garments. Don’t try anything that needs to be lined with another fabric; that’s too advanced for the beginner. Start with simple pieces like A-line skirts or basic tops, and work on things like this until you are very comfortable with your skills

5

Choose the required fabric and supplies. On the back of the pattern, you’ll be instructed as to which fabric will suit the sewing project. You will note that some patterns suggest a range of fabric types, as well as warnings for fabrics that are not suitable. This gives you leeway to purchase fabric that you like, or that’s within budget, etc., as well as forewarning you that you will may have a bad experience if you try to use fabric not suited for the pattern in question!

  1. The amount of fabric will also be noted; this is important as it gives you an indication of the cost if you need to buy it, or can help you to decide whether you’ve enough fabric at home already.
    6
    Make sure to get all sewing notions. These are the extras required to complete the pattern, such as zips, buttons, embellishments, etc. The size, length, and number of such notions is usually made clear.
    7
    Be smart about fabric usage. Once you’re more comfortable using patterns, you’ll want to find smarter ways to lay out your pattern and cut the fabric. You can save a lot of money this way, as patterns can often be more than a little generous. Don’t worry about this in the beginning though, as you will not have the skills to judge where to cut right away.

Part Five of Five:
Getting Extra Help


1
Learn to use a sewing machine. A sewing machine will be much easier and can be crucial for sewing some patterns.
2
Learn to hand-stitch. Hand sewing is also a good skill to have and can make some patterns or parts of patterns easier to sew, if you can build the skill.


3
Sew button holes. Learning to sew button holes can be a very useful sewing skill.


4
Make a nice seam. Making a professional looking seam is also an important sewing skill.


5
Alter your clothes. Learning how to alter patterns and existing clothes will also be necessary to learn over time.

Community Q&A

Should I cut out the patterns?

Answer

Yes. Cut the patterns out first, then pin them to your fabric, then cut your fabric. If you are making multiple outfits from the same pattern, but in different sizes, consider tracing or photocopying the pattern first, then using the copies.

What does it mean where it says on the back of the pattern the amount of fabric I need (i.e. 45 or 60)?

Answer

It means the width of the purchased fabric.

Do I iron the pattern?

Answer

If your pattern tissue paper is very wrinkled, sure, it helps to read it. Be sure to use a very low setting on the iron.

What does right side up mean?

Answer

If the fabric is right side up, the outside (the side of the garment you see when worn) will be facing you when placed on the table. If the pattern is right side up, you will see the print.

How do I cut multi-size patterns?

Answer

Measure yourself with a measuring tape (or the person you’re making the clothes for) first, Write down the measurements, then take another look at the pattern envelope. It will show you which line of the pattern tissue paper to cut on based on size.
I’m trying to sew pockets onto a gathered apron skirt, and the instructions are not making sense to me.

Why does it want me to sew the pockets on before attaching the fabric to the rest of the skirt?

Answer

Attaching the pockets first makes it easier to sew them on without wrinkles. Doing this first also means you have less fabric to deal with later when assembling the rest of the skirt.

Do I need to sew the pattern, too?

Answer

No, the purpose of the paper pattern is to help you to carefully cut out the fabric first, including notches, then transfer the dart/button markings/instructions from the paper pattern onto your fabric with a piece of chalk or (washable) fabric marker so you’ll know where to sew those things. After the fabric is cut, the pattern can be set aside.

Is it easier to make doll clothes or real clothes?

Answer

Each have their pros and cons. Doll clothes use less fabric, and therefore are more forgiving on your wallet if you mess up, but if they have intricate details, they may be much harder to execute.

Should I over sew before joining pieces?

Answer

It depends on your fabric. Cotton is a fabric that can fray. It’s a good thing to “overlock” or “zig-zag” stitch on the very edges of your fabric before you sew the pieces together. It’s better to do this before you sew your fabric together just because it’ll be much easier to feed one piece of flat fabric through the machine first.

Should I pin my fabric on the right side of the fabric or the wrong side of the fabric?

Answer

You want to pin the fabric on the side that will be facing up as you are sewing it. This will usually mean fabric pieces should be pinned together from the wrong side so that you can easily take the pins out as you are sewing it.

Tips

For sewing your first pattern, don’t buy expensive fabric because you may not be able to fix mistakes.
Determine the right side and wrong side of the fabric. The wrong side is the fabric worn against the body once the garment is completed. Use a pin to mark the wrong side of the fabric.
Double-check measurements, seam allowances, and needle-type for your fabric. Not all sewing machine needles are the same.

Have a good sewing book.

Vintage and older publications are fine too; indeed, you may have inherited one that has withstood the test of time. If need be, keep a metric chart with older books so that you can quickly update older measurements.
Some easy sewing patterns are available from most major sewing companies. Some major sewing pattern are available in our store, BOX AND BARREL

133B ETI OSA WAY DOLPHIN ESTATE IKOYI LAGOS

These patterns are clearly marked ‘easy’ and can be found at almost any large department store or fabric store.
“Always after cutting out the pattern pieces you are using be sure to iron them with a dry iron to get rid of any wrinkles or creases in the pattern paper.”
Warnings
Also, kitties just love playing with (shredding) tissue patterns. You’ve been warned!
Note: If you have small children, you’ll need to watch pins and scissors like a hawk.

Things You’ll Need

Sewing pattern
Straight pins – for a simple project, one box of pins should be enough. Straight pins are always used in sewing so you can never have too many.

Pins with pearl heads or plastic ball heads are best, and easiest to see if you drop them on the carpet. Don’t work barefoot, at least not as a beginner!
Pincushion and container to store the pins.

A magnetic “pincushion” is very handy. (Remember that magnets can damage your computer and demagnetize the magnetic strip on credit or debit cards, so keep such a cushion away from your sensitive electronics.) Most sewers keep some pins in their pincushion, but store the bulk of pins in a container with a lid, a box, empty breath-mint tin, etc.
Tailor’s chalk or a tracing wheel and dressmaker’s colored carbon paper to mark the fabric for darts etc. The dressmaker’s carbon paper will be near the tracing wheels at the fabric store. Never use office-type carbon paper, as it will not wash out.
Tape measure to make measurements of body sizes and to check the pattern.

A ruler is useful (but not mandatory) if you need to lengthen or shorten the pattern.

Paper scissors and fabric shears – note: quite a few sewers use the same pair of scissors/shears for fabric and tissue patterns. But the scissors are reserved only for fabric and tissue patterns – not for gift wrap, craft projects, trimming hair – only for fabric and tissue patterns. Alternatively, splash out and keep separate scissors for the pattern tissue, for the fabric, and for your other craft projects (label them!).
Large, smooth, snag-free cutting surface (clean floors are okay). Large kitchen tables and ping-pong tables work fine, too, so long as you can lay the fabric out.

If you use a carpeted floor, you’ll need to slide cardboard underneath the fabric, or you’ll end up pinning everything to the carpet. Carpet also harbors a lot of fluff, animal fur, and dust, so be cautious and ensure it’s very clean before laying fabric on it.
Colored pen to mark alterations on the paper pattern.

Scotch tape to “take in” paper pattern, and make alterations to fit, although it’s easier to just pin the alteration, instead of taping it.

How to Make Your Own Dress — Tips and Tricks From a Box and Barrel

It has happened to the best of us: The shopping disaster day. We drag ourself from shop to shop or taylor to taylor, searching for that perfect dress and go home empty-handed and frustrated. But what if I told you that you could make the dress of your dreams, and that it would fit you perfectly? Want to try sewing a dress for yourself, but don’t know where to start? Well, I’m here to share my beginner sewing tips and tricks to get you started.

Growing up I thought that making my own clothes was something out of my reach. I believed only certain people (like my cousin Aisling) possessed the sewing gift. These days, more and more people are taking up sewing as a hobby, and whilst I will probably never be able to make a wedding dress or anything delicate or detailed, I too have caught the sewing bug. And I learned this secret: If you concentrate and believe you can do something, then you can MAKE IT WORK.

DIY, in general, is the talk of the town these days. You can make your own christmas decorations, concoct your own face masks and delight your whole family with homemade gifts for the festive season. Along with this upsurge in craftiness came TV shows such as Project Runway and The Great British Sewing Bee, bringing sewing back onto our screens and making it hip and trendy again. Other trends that are super popular right now are up-cycling and retro-style, both leading to a heightened interest in sewing, of course.

There are many reasons to start making your own clothes. Amongst them are these:

  • Possessing clothes that fit you perfectly. You can take measurements of every imaginable body part and adjust your pattern exactly to suit your shape. At a time when people are standing up and refusing to conform to the body norms of the fashion industry, it feels very empowering to make clothes for your body.
  • Wearing your own style. I personally love colorful clothes with playful prints, and you will often find me enviously browsing the four to eight-year-old styles in stores! The last dress I made was from the Camelot Fabrics Frolicking Forest range, labeled children’s pajama fabric, but I’m cool with that! Now I have a dress with the cutest little foxes ever on it. Who else can say that? At the moment, I’m working on a red dress with funny little sheep on it, and OK, I admit I sometimes get not-so-positive comments. But they are never really mean; some people just don’t understand.
“Wow the kid you’re making that dress for must be really big, how old is she?” From a friendly, well-meaning old sewing lady

The thing is, I love wearing fun, colorful fabrics. It makes me happy and I refuse to conform!

  • Avoiding mainstream production companies, because they’ve got enough money, right?
  • Knowing for sure that you have in no way contributed to child labor or extreme chemical processes involved in the manufacture of many clothing in our stores. It is relatively easy to find organic cotton and ethically printed fabrics.

So those are the reasons. But before I give you my sewing tips and tricks, I have a confession to make: I am a lazy sewist. I cut corners, I skip steps and I ignore instructions if they seem too complicated. I am by no means a good example, and people who sew professionally (or who have actually studied sewing) would tear their hair out if they saw me working. But here is my advice none the less. Writing this article, I kept hearing Baz Luhrmann’s “Everybody’s Free To Wear Sunscreen” in my head, so you should read the below in his voice. It adds to the effect!

WHEN PREPARING TO SEW:

  • Find someone knowledgeable to translate the pattern into understandable English for you. I have found that owners of fabric shops are great for this (if you buy your fabric there and bring your pattern along, they’re normally delighted to go through it with you).
  • Surround yourself with other sewing enthusiasts and plan sewing dates, find sewing workshops in your area and get involved. Sitting in a room with a few sewing people is great motivation and helps you avoid getting distracted from the task at hand. It is also fun and you can all learn from your mistakes together.
  • Eat, drink and sleep YouTube tutorials.
  • Get lost on Pinterest for a few hours! Before I start making anything, I search Pinterest to see how other people have made it. That way you pick up loads of inspiration about fabric choice, color combinations, possible adaptations and decide which options are best for you. This step is also very valuable to help imagine what your finished dress could look like. I thought the grey velvet Danielle looks terrible, but when I saw a few versions on Pinterest I decided I loved the pattern (I have already started working on my second one).
  • Do not think you are going to make cheap dresses or save money on clothes. Good quality fabric, thread, workshops, pattern and sewing books all cost money. You just have to try not to think about it, enjoy the time spent making your creation, and the thrill of wearing something you made all by yourself.
  • A very important thing you must do as soon as you buy your fabric is to throw it in the washing machine and give it a wash on your normal cycle. Imagine making a perfect fitting dress and having it shrink the first time you wash it? That would be too painful for words. That being said, I have to admit I am guilty of skipping this stage when I buy new fabric, and start sewing it up like an excited child. If you are like me and don’t have the patience to wash and dry the fabric, you should at least steam iron it really well before sewing. I’m pretty sure that people are soon going to start noticing the consequences of me being afraid to put my creations in the wash! Having a bit of patience in the beginning can save you a lot of stress in the end!

ADVICE FOR SEWING DAY:

  • Prepare nibbles before you start; it is awfully frustrating to have to leave your sewing table to go make something to eat. We were lucky that our wonderful sewing tutor Lieke is also a fantastic cook and sorted us out with some yummy cupcakes!
  • Tie your hair in an up-do. You need to concentrate really hard when cutting out your fabric; if your hair is long and falling in your eyes it will drive you crazy.
SOURCE: Eamonn McCormack/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images
  • That photo reminds me of another important tip: Wear comfortable clothes! I’m talking tracksuits or pajama comfort level; get cosy and make yourself feel lovely because you’re going to have to concentrate. (I’m starting to think I have serious concentration issues considering how many times I have mentioned it in this article!)
  • A top tip I got from my fashion designer BFF based in China is that if you lose your concentration and feel like everything is going wrong, take a break. Put the kettle on, grab some of those nibbles and think about something else for a minute. Ploughing on will not get you your focus back; you will just make some serious mistakes.
  • Get to know your feet! I’m not talking about the ones on the ends of your legs but the little shiny parts you attach to your machine. I somehow ended up with a machine without any extra feet, and so I never learned about them. After discovering the world of sewing machine feet and buying some, my sewing has come on in leaps and bounds. It’s amazing how easy certain tasks become if you use the right foot for it.
  • When tracing and cutting your pattern, use weights to keep it in place. I used sticky tape in the beginning and always ended up damaging my pattern. It doesn’t have to be anything fancy, just something heavy!
  • Check and double check each step before you sew (tearing out your stitches and starting again is an annoying and slow process). It is also quite difficult to do without poking holes in your fabric and destroying the whole friggin’ thing. If you DO have to rip something, use a seam-ripper. Do NOT go at it with a scissors, you WILL cut holes where holes should not be, and that is bad: very, very bad.
  • Make sure you are ONLY sewing what you intended to sew and that there are not extra layers folded under the unforgiving needle. I don’t want to admit how often have I sewn my soon-to-be fabulous new dress to the sleeve of my bath robe.
  • Don’t plan anything major for the rest of your day. I’m always surprised by how exhausted I am after a few hours of sewing. You need to concentrate, but it is so much fun that you don’t realise how much energy is required until you sit down afterwards.

And so, I hope I have encouraged you to give sewing a try. Not only is it fun, but if I can do it then you certainly can! My tips and tricks may not be conventional, but they helped me and hopefully I’ve saved you from learning them the hard way.

Jewelry Hanging Organizer – Clear The Clutter, Organize Your Jewelry Pieces

Jewelry Hanging Organizer – Clear The Clutter, Organize Your Jewelry Pieces

Out of sight, out of mind – this is certainly true in case of jewelry pieces because we tend to forget about the jewelry items that are lying in a pile somewhere in our drawer or cupboard and only remember it after we manage to dig it up. It goes without saying that all women have a considerable amount of jewelry in their possession, therefore wouldn’t it be useful to have jewelry hanging organizer that helps you keep all your jewelry items organized in a clutter-free manner? Having best jewelry organizer in your room will make things a lot easier for you because you wouldn’t ever need to ‘rummage’ through your jewelry storage space frantically in search of the piece you need!

Moreover, jewelry holders play an important role in storing the individual jewelry pieces properly to prevent damage caused to the delicate metals, gemstones or accents when such jewelry pieces rub against one another. This type of jewelry organizer will also help you save a lot of space and put a much-desired end to the rage experienced when looking for the jewelry piece that you need to wear but cannot find. Also, you will never lose your jewelry when you use this type of organizer.

When learning how to organize jewelry, you can consider buying the following popular organizers:

 

1) Bracelet and Necklace Hanging Organizer – Household Essentials

Household Essentials Bracelet and Necklace Hanging Jewelry Organizer Natural Canvas This natural canvas jewelry storage organizer is a great pick for those looking to hang their necklaces and bracelets. This is a green product as it is made from natural cotton canvas. It comes with a large sturdy hook to hang the entire organizer, which measures about 32×18 inches. The double-sided design allows you to put as many jewelry pieces as you’d like, thus making the product very space-efficient.

You can use this one to hold up to 14 bracelets and 21 necklaces. All in all, this is a must have for all ladies who wish to think outside the box and store their jewelry in a unique and practical manner.  Click Here To Buy From Box and Barrel..

2)  Organizing Jewelry Valet in White

Organizing Jewelry Valet in White

Fed up of having your jewelry locked up in a jewelry cabinet? As a result of locking your jewelry up, you tend to forget about them, so it is advisable to store one’s jewelry on a jewelry valet. This type of product helps brings all your jewelry in one place, thus making it easy and convenient for one to access the jewelry. With this beautiful white jewelry valet, you can hold all your jewelry pieces together and never forget about them.

This valet makes it easier to access your jewelry. The over-the-door hook makes this into an over door jewelry organizer, which means you can save some space in your room for other products. 

3)  Mirrotek Over the Door Jewelry and Makeup Armoire – Cherry Finish

Mirrotek EVA48CH Over The Door combination Jewelry and Makeup Armoire Cherry finish

Don’t have space in your room for a wall mount jewelry armoire? How about a hanging door jewelry organizer armoire? This is a mirrored armoire that opens up to reveal plenty of shelves and brackets to store your jewelry and makeup items. It also comes with a locking facility and two keys are provided with it. The shelves are large enough for you to store body lotions and other bottled beauty products.

The lovely cherry finish of the armoire instantly perks up the room. Thus, this is not just an organizer for your jewelry but you can also store your makeup items in it and use it as a mirror for the room, talk about saving space.

4) Wall mounted Jewelry Organizer In Satin Nickel Silver Finish

Wall Mount Earring Holder And Necklace Storage Rack Closet Hanging Jewelry Organizer (Satin Nickel Silver)

A wall mounted jewelry armoire is good but it can occupy a lot of space, which is where the rack closet comes into the picture. This one is perfect for holding all your jewelry items such as watches, earrings, necklaces and even rings! Made of pure US Carbon steel, this one comes in an exquisite satin nickel silver finish, which makes the product exude elegance and opulence.

You can display up to 48 pairs of earrings on this rack closet and hold up to 50 necklaces, depending upon the size of the necklaces. This one is a perfect gift for all females, be it little girls, teenagers, young adults or mothers. 

Jewelry Hanging Storage Conclusion

It can be said that jewelry hanging organizer or wall mount ones are perfect for storing and holding all your jewelry pieces and trinkets from the really tiny ones to the large and bulky statement accessories. Investing in these would not only help you save space, it would also save your time and do away with frustration of finding the required jewelry from a pile inside the jewelry box. Thus, if you don’t have one of these already then it is high time you purchase one and experience the difference a jewelry organizer can make in your life.

10 Steps to a Decluttered Closet

10 Steps to a Decluttered Closet

Learn how to make your closet work for you — and your clothes.

10 Steps to a Decluttered Closet

Learn how to make your closet work for you — and your clothes.

Closets Decluttering Organization
Walk-In Man’s Closet With Shoe Shelf

Step 1: Assess Your Big Obstacles

Are your shoes overtaking the space? Try a hanging-shoe rack or over-the-door organizer. Do your clothes overcrowd? Thinner hangers create space so you can find things easier. Feeling rushed each morning? Dividing shirts, dresses, jeans, etc. bring a sense of order and saves time. Solving your biggest problem will motivate you to create the closet of your dreams.

Step 2: Make it a Family Effort

Getting your hubby and kids involved in organizing can make a difference in your family’s day-to-day life. Everyone should be in charge of his or her own clothes, accessories, and toys. This will cut your cleaning time in half and ensure nothing important is thrown away by mistake.

Step 3: Take An Hour

Scheduling just 60 minutes a week can really make a dent in your overstuffed, cluttered closet. Can’t spare that much? Try two half-hour sessions. If you’re constantly being interrupted by “Hey Mom!” — ask your spouse to take the kids out for the afternoon. Remember to return the favor when it’s his turn to hit the closets.

Modular Shoe Storage

Step 4: Start from Scratch

Take everything (yes, everything) out of your closet. If you don’t remove it all, chances are the same unworn clothes will be moved around the closet. Now it’s time to sort. Throw out old and damaged clothing. Donate what you don’t need or don’t wear.

Step 5: Out with the Odd

Remove items that have no business in your closet. Bank statements, insurance information, or tax documents don’t belong next to your shoes, scarves, and sweaters. Create a Life.doc to organize and store all of your important documents in one accessible place. File the remaining papers in an office cabinet or milk crate.

Step 6: Organize in Sections

Designate a place for everything in your closet. Shoes in one place, sweaters in another, and so on. This will help you keep order and save you time each morning. Make smart use of the space. Installing shelves will double your storage and help sweaters and t-shirts keep their shape better.

Step 7: Apply the 80/20 Rule

You may not want to admit it, but the majority of clothes you have probably go unworn. It’s said that the average American only wears 10 to 20 percent of their clothes. To cut down on the fluff, remove items you haven’t worn in a year. Drop off the excess at Goodwill or arrange a clotheswap with friends.

Step 8: Put One In; Take One Out

For each new item you buy to put in your closet, donate one item (or pitch it if it’s past its prime). This will keep you from returning to your pack-rat ways.

Clothes Closet

Step 9: Keep It Going

Dedicate 15 minutes a week to straightening your closet after the “big clean”. Spending this small amount of time will ensure you never have to go through a major de-clutter again.

Step 10: Reward Yourself

Recognize and celebrate what you’ve done. Treat yourself to some new hangers or buy that silk blouse you’ve been eyeing. Now, you actually have room for it!

By: Sarah Welch and Alicia Rockmore
Related To:

Step 1: Assess Your Big Obstacles

Are your shoes overtaking the space? Try a hanging-shoe rack or over-the-door organizer. Do your clothes overcrowd? Thinner hangers create space so you can find things easier. Feeling rushed each morning?  Dividing shirts, dresses, jeans, etc. bring a sense of order and saves time. Solving your biggest problem will motivate you to create the closet of your dreams.

Step 2: Make it a Family Effort

Getting your hubby and kids involved in organizing can make a difference in your family’s day-to-day life. Everyone should be in charge of his or her own clothes, accessories, and toys. This will cut your cleaning time in half and ensure nothing important is thrown away by mistake.

Step 3: Take An Hour

Scheduling just 60 minutes a week can really make a dent in your overstuffed, cluttered closet. Can’t spare that much? Try two half-hour sessions. If you’re constantly being interrupted by “Hey Mom!” — ask your spouse to take the kids out for the afternoon. Remember to return the favor when it’s his turn to hit the closets.

Step 4: Start from Scratch

Take everything (yes, everything) out of your closet. If you don’t remove it all, chances are the same unworn clothes will be moved around the closet. Now it’s time to sort. Throw out old and damaged clothing. Donate what you don’t need or don’t wear.

Step 5: Out with the Odd

Remove items that have no business in your closet. Bank statements, insurance information, or tax documents don’t belong next to your shoes, scarves, and sweaters. Create a Life.doc to organize and store all of your important documents in one accessible place. File the remaining papers in an office cabinet or milk crate.

Step 6: Organize in Sections

Designate a place for everything in your closet. Shoes in one place, sweaters in another, and so on. This will help you keep order and save you time each morning. Make smart use of the space. Installing shelves will double your storage and help sweaters and t-shirts keep their shape better.

DK – House Works ,

Step 7: Apply the 80/20 Rule

You may not want to admit it, but the majority of clothes you have probably go unworn. It’s said that the average American only wears 10 to 20 percent of their clothes. To cut down on the fluff, remove items you haven’t worn in a year. Drop off the excess at Goodwill or arrange a clotheswap with friends.

Step 8: Put One In; Take One Out

For each new item you buy to put in your closet, donate one item (or pitch it if it’s past its prime). This will keep you from returning to your pack-rat ways.

Step 9: Keep It Going

Dedicate 15 minutes a week to straightening your closet after the “big clean”. Spending this small amount of time will ensure you never have to go through a major de-clutter again.

Step 10: Reward Yourself

Recognize and celebrate what you’ve done. Treat yourself to some new hangers or buy that silk blouse you’ve been eyeing. Now, you actually have room for it!
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